Republican National Convention, 2024

Republican National Convention, 2024
Republican National Convention, 2024

2024 Presidential ElectionDate: November 5, 2024 Presidential candidates • Electoral College in the 2024 presidential election • PredictIt markets • Presidential debates • Timeline of announcements • Important dates • Presidential election by state • Campaign finance • Endorsements • Logos and slogans • Key staffers • Vice presidential candidates Democratic nomination Democratic National Convention, 2024 • Delegate rules Republican nomination Republican National Convention, 2024 • Delegate rules • Campaign travel • Debates Minor party nominations Green Party • Libertarian Party Use the dropdown menu below to read more about noteworthy candidates Ballotpedia’s presidential election coverage2024 • 2020 • 2016

The 2024 Republican National Convention will take place in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from July 15-18, 2024.[1]

The national nominating convention is the formal ceremony during which the party officially selects its nominee and adopts a party platform. The delegates are individuals chosen to represent their state or territory at the convention.

This page provides the following information:

  • Rules of the Republican Party (as adopted on August 24, 2020, and amended on April 14, 2022)
  • Call of the 2020 Republican National Convention
  • Dispute over the status of the Republican Party and its national convention

Click the following links for more information about the Republican presidential nomination process in 2020:

  • Republican National Convention, 2020
  • Republican presidential nomination, 2020
  • Republican delegate rules, 2020

Host city

On July 15, 2022, the Republican National Committee’s Site Selection Committee voted to recommend Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as the host city for the 2024 Republican National Convention. On August 5, the RNC voted to give final approval to the selection.[2][3]

Delegates

See also: Republican delegate rules, 2024

In 2024, there are an estimated 2,469 delegates: 2,365 pledged delegates and 104 unpledged delegates.

To win the Republican nomination, a presidential candidate must receive support from a majority of delegates—an estimated 1,235 delegates.

Pledged delegates

Pledged delegates, also called bound delegates, are bound to vote on at least the first ballot at the national convention based on the results of their states’ primary or caucus. The Rules of the Republican Party, as passed in July 2020 and amended in July 2022, state the following:

See also  Valspar Championship Tips

Any statewide presidential preference vote that permits a choice among candidates for the Republican nomination for President of the United States in a primary, caucuses, or a state convention must be used to allocate and bind the state’s delegation to the national convention in either a proportional or winner-take-all manner for at least one round of balloting, except for delegates and alternate delegates who appear on a ballot in a statewide election and are elected directly by primary voters or delegates bound to a candidate that withdraws from the presidential race. [4]

—Rule 16(a)(1), The Rules of the Republican Party[5]

There are four distinct types of pledged Republican delegates:[6]

Pledged district delegates are distributed and elected at the congressional district level. The Republican Party assigns three district-level delegates to each congressional district.

Pledged at-large delegates are distributed and elected statewide. The Republican Party assigns 10 at-large delegates to each state.

Pledged party leaders: The Republican Party gives delegate status to three party leaders from each state and territory—its national committeeman, national committeewoman, and state party chair.

Pledged bonus delegates: Bonus delegates are assigned to states whose electoral votes went to the Republican nominee in the last presidential election and to states in which Republicans hold: the governorship, at least half of U.S. representative seats, a majority of a state legislative chamber, a majority of seats in both legislative chambers, or a U.S. Senate seat (elected within the past six years).

Unpledged delegates

Unpledged delegates, also called unbound delegates, are not bound by the results of state primaries or caucuses. Some state and territory party rules dictate that some or all of their Republican delegates are unbound.[7] The following was an estimate of unbound Republican delegates as of March 2023.

  • Pennsylvania’s 51 district-level delegates are not bound to support any particular presidential candidate.
  • All 29 of North Dakota’s Republican delegates are unpledged.
  • Wyoming’s three party leader delegates are unpledged.
  • All 18 delegates from American Samoa (9) and Guam (9) are unpledged. The Virgin Islands’ three party leader delegates are also unpledged.
See also  Golf Compendium

Rules of the Republican Party

The following document was adopted on August 24, 2020, at the 2020 Republican National Convention, and amended by the Republican National Committee on April 14, 2022. These rules will govern the 2024 Republican presidential nomination process.

Call of the 2020 Republican National Convention

Dispute over the status of the Republican Party and its national convention

The Republican Party is a private unincorporated association which operates through the agreement of its members rather than a set of bylaws or permanent charter. The party is instead governed by Robert’s Rules of Order and any rules of order adopted at the party’s most recent convention.[8][9][10]

Curly Haugland, a former member of the Republican National Committee (RNC), said the party’s continued existence is dependent on the quadrennial convention of delegates to re-establish the party. Failing to properly convene the convention of delegates, therefore, would jeopardize the party’s survival.[8][11]

He said the phrase “until the next national convention” in the third and final paragraph of the Preamble of the Rules of the Republican Party, as amended by the Republican National Committee on July 20, 2018, indicates the party’s impermanent structure:

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the following be and hereby are adopted as The Rules of the Republican Party, composed of the rules for the election and government of the Republican National Committee until the next national convention, the rules under which delegates and alternate delegates shall be allotted to the respective states in the next national convention, and the rules under which such delegates and alternate delegates shall be elected and under which contests shall be considered, and the rules of business of this national convention.[4]

See also  Lợi suất trái phiếu là gì? Chiến lược đầu tư lợi suất trái phiếu

—Rules of the Republican Party (2018), Preamble

Haugland said the RNC improperly used Rule 37(e) to proceed with a downsized and invalid national convention in August 2020. Rule 37(e) states the following:

If the Republican National Committee determines that the national convention cannot convene or is unable to conduct its business either within the convention site or within the convention city, then and only then, the roll call for nomination for President of the United States and Vice President of the United States shall be allowed to be conducted according to procedures authorized by the Republican National Committee.[4]

—Rules of the Republican Party (2018), Rule 37(e)

Haugland said this rule, allowing for modifications to convention procedures, applied only to the roll call. In using it to alter the other activities of the convention, Haugland said the Republican Party failed to properly convene the 2020 Republican National Convention.[8]

Under this interpretation, no rules were adopted for the election of delegates to the 2024 Republican National Convention or the party’s continued existence in 2020.[8][11]

If you are aware of an alternative interpretation of the Republican Party’s rules, please submit a response to [email protected].

Recent news

  • Search Google News for this topic

See also

  • Democratic National Convention, 2024
  • Presidential election, 2020
  • Republican National Convention, 2020
  • Republican National Convention, 2016
  • Republican National Committee

External links

  • Republican National Committee website
  • Library of Congess: Republican National Political Conventions, 1856-2008

Footnotes

2024 United States presidential electionOverviewsDates and deadlinesNoteworthy candidatesNoteworthy campaign staffDemocratic primaryRepublican primaryDebatesMinor party nominationsWithdrawn noteworthy primary candidates and campaign staff BallotpediaAboutEditorial

Comments are closed.
Ky Phu,Nho Quan,Ninh Binh, Viet Nam Country
+84.229 6333 111

BOOKING TEE TIME

[formidable id=8 title=true description=true]
Trang An Golf and Resort